Tohoku J. Exp. Med., 1988, 154 (4)

A Case-Control Study of Lung Cancer in Nonsmoking Women

HIROYUKI SHIMIZU, MUNEHIKO MORISHITA,* KATSUYUKI MIZUNO, TAKAO MASUDA, YUKIO OGURA, MITSUHIKO SANTO, MINORU NISHIMURA,§ KAZUO KUNISHIMA," KAZUO KARASAWA," KEISUKE NISHIWAKI, MASAHIKO YAMAMOTO,* SHIGERU HISAMICHI and SUKETAMI TOMINAGA**

Department of Public Health, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai 980, *the Second Department of Internal Medicine, Nagoya City University, Medical School, Nagoya 467, the Third Department of Internal Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Aichi 480-11, Department of Internal Medicine, National Nagoya Hospital, Nagoya 460, §Department of Internal Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya 464, "Department of Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya 464, Department of Internal Medicine, Chukyo Hospital, Nagoya 457 and **Division of Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya 464

A case-control study of Japanese women in Nagoya was conducted to investigate the significance of passive smoking and other factors in relation to the etiology of female lung cancer. A total of 90 nonsmoking patients with primary lung cancer and their age- and hospital-matched female controls were asked to fill in a questionnaire in the hospital. Elevated relative risk (RR) of lung cancer was observed for passive smoking from mother (RR=4.0; p<0.05) and from husband's father (RR=3.2; p<0.05). No association was observed between the risk of lung cancer and smoking of husband or passive smoke exposure at work. Occupational exposure to iron or other metals also showed high risk (RR=4.8; p<0.05). No appreciable differences in food intakes were observed between cases and controls.

Key words ——lung cancer; women; nonsmoker; passive smoking; metal exposure

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Tohoku J. Exp. Med., 1988, 154, 389-397